Coping with change in the SIS Policy environment – Taking care of yourself and your staff

Nyrie Butterfield

PNL 4WDriving

 

Abstract:

These last three or four years have been very hectic in the teaching environment. We have all had to upgrade our teaching qualifications, validate all our materials and now come to grip with the massive changes to the Outdoor Training package.
CEO and staff have become quite stressed identifying what is happening, how they affect the particular company, what is now actually required. Companies have had to rewrite masses of lesson plans, assessments, instructions needed, try to validate, and keep the CEO from snapping everyone’s heads off when you tell them how much work is still needed before you can actually implement these and possible start some training.
Is has been really important to break each of these changes into small parts and celebrate each small incremental step. “HIC”
As a CEO of a small RTO, this is extremely hard to do as you are the telephonist, office assistant, typist, HR person, teacher, assessor, data processor, car packer, general dogsbody as well as a salesman and spectacular entrepreneur.

We have needed to take time away from work. Take the office out to lunch, do something different for a weekend, getaway overseas, laugh, cry throw a tantrum, preferably when there is no one around and make sure you LAUGH a lot. The saying is “if you don’t laugh you cry.” “SO LAUGH even at yourself” is now written in two-foot block letters on the office back wall. We have introduced some random things like changing desks or singing the next line, each time a particular song comes on, going down the beach and running in the waves without shoes, just to put some fun into work. It also helps to recognize partners with a simple small gift as they take care of us all at home.
So “THANKS Staff and Families”


Biography:

Nyrie started her outdoor adventures as a brownie and continued as a Queen’s Guide, Ranger, Rover and then officer training in the Army. This covers everything from hiking, camping cooking, wonderful adventures, rock climbing, canoeing, skiing, and eventually 4wdriving for weeks at a time all over Australia. She camped and hiked as a guide and when 18 went camping and hiking with her little 2wd car. She found lovely spots next to rivers but as we drove down the road, we slid down the hills on the chassis of the car. So we camped and next day continued on; at the end we found the sign saying ROAD CLOSED, wondering why town councils that only put the signs up close to town so the locals dont use the road. IT DEFINATELY needs to be at BOTH ends. I was going out with my boyfriend at that stage and after we had had that experience 3 or4 times we decided we had best buy a 4wd so we might have some hope of getting out instead of having to walk out. We jumped on the train and went to Sydney, packed out camping gearin the new4wd and spent 2 weeks in the blue mountains all by ourselves trying to work out how the 4wd works. the salesman just gives you the keys and says goodbye and the book doesn’t help as it is written in Jinglish and you dont understand the terms anyway. After a week in the bush, we joined a 4wdrive club and learnt to use our vehicle safely, had lots of fun and started teaching other people to use their 4wdrive. That was 30 years ago and it’s still fun, we have covered most of Australia over that time.

Risk management in a safety dependent environment – an embodied approach

Dr Melenie Ross1
1Gabben Consulting, Vacy, Australia

 

Abstract:
Safety dependent learning environments are those were learners are routinely exposed to safety hazards and risk. Such environments require effective control measures to be implemented to reduce the likelihood and impact of safety related incidents.

Despite the most robust risk management framework, safety related incidents still occur due to a number of factors. Within some safety dependent learning environments, the nature of learning itself has an increased element of safety risk, whilst others introduce elements of safety risk as a result of the unique contexts where learning occurs.

Drawing on research in the vocational context, and applying a model of knowledge partnerships, this presentation will explore the knowledge required to connect theory and practice where safety risk management is a key consideration in the learning environment. Forming parallels between safety dependent vocational education and outdoor learning, the role of embodied learning to simulate specific situations is examined as an approach for developing a sense of noticing and knowing within the learning environment, leading to authentic, safe, experiences.


Biography:
Melenie has over 20 years experience in Adult and Vocational Education, in both the public and private sector. Her doctoral research focused on the role of safety risk management within safety dependent vocations. When not working, Melenie is out exploring the forests and mountains in the Hunter Valley region on her heritage stock horse, Baritone

Coping with change in the SIS Policy environment – Taking care of yourself and your staff

Mrs Nyrie Butterfield1
1PNL 4WDriving, Carrum Downs , Australia

 

Abstract:
These last three or four years have been very hectic in the teaching environment. We have all had to upgrade our teaching qualifications, validate all our materials and now come to grip with the massive changes to the Outdoor Training package.

CEO and staff have become quite stressed identifying what is happening, how they affect the particular company, what is now actually required. Companies have had to rewrite masses of lesson plans, assessments, instructions needed, try to validate, and keep the CEO from snapping everyone’s heads off when you tell them how much work is still needed before you can actually implement these and possible start some training.

Is has been really important to break each of these changes into small parts and celebrate each small incremental step. “HIC”

As a CEO of a small RTO, this is extremely hard to do as you are the telephonist, office assistant, typist, HR person, teacher, assessor, data processor, car packer, general dogsbody as well as a salesman and spectacular entrepreneur.

We have needed to take time away from work. Take the office out to lunch, do something different for a weekend, getaway overseas, laugh, cry throw a tantrum, preferably when there is no one around and make sure you LAUGH a lot. The saying is “if you don’t laugh you cry.” “SO LAUGH even at yourself” is now written in two-foot block letters on the office back wall. We have introduced some random things like changing desks or singing the next line, each time a particular song comes on, going down the beach and running in the waves without shoes, just to put some fun into work. It also helps to recognize partners with a simple small gift as they take care of us all at home.
So “THANKS Staff and Families”


Biography:
Nyrie started her outdoor adventures as a brownie and continued as a Queen’s Guide, Ranger, Rover and then officer training in the Army. This covers everything from hiking, camping cooking, wonderful adventures, rock climbing, canoeing, skiing, and eventually 4wdriving for weeks at a time all over Australia. She camped and hiked as a guide and when 18 went camping and hiking with her little 2wd car. She found lovely spots next to rivers but as we drove down the road, we slid down the hills on the chassis of the car. So we camped and next day continued on; at the end we found the sign saying ROAD CLOSED, wondering why town councils that only put the signs up close to town so the locals dont use the road. IT DEFINATELY needs to be at BOTH ends. I was going out with my boyfriend at that stage and after we had had that experience 3 or4 times we decided we had best buy a 4wd so we might have some hope of getting out instead of having to walk out. We jumped on the train and went to Sydney, packed out camping gearin the new4wd and spent 2 weeks in the blue mountains all by ourselves trying to work out how the 4wd works. the salesman just gives you the keys and says goodbye and the book doesn’t help as it is written in Jinglish and you dont understand the terms anyway. After a week in the bush, we joined a 4wdrive club and learnt to use our vehicle safely, had lots of fun and started teaching other people to use their 4wdrive. That was 30 years ago and it’s still fun, we have covered most of Australia over that time.

What? Bucket lunch again! An exploration of dietary perspectives and practices of journey-based outdoor leaders in an Australian context

Mr Brendon Munge1, Mrs Jaclyn Munge1,2, Dr Marcus Morse2, Dr Adrienne Forsyth2
1University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia; 2La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia

 

Abstract:
What we eat, how much we eat, and how it affects us has numerous implications when we lead journey based outdoor education trips. This presentation reports on a study of outdoor leaders from an Australian outdoor education provider and the resultant strategies they implement to manage their diets. The research identified that journey-based outdoor leaders could be at risk of nutrient deficiencies due to repetitive menus and/or poor dietary practices, with implications for resultant personal health and work performance. To understand these issues, the researchers explored the outdoor leaders’ dietary preferences and motivations for dietary practices, with findings corroborated by field observations on two journey-based programs.

This presentation will discuss the key findings that influence the dietary practices of the outdoor leaders and provide insights into methods to aid the dietary planning for outdoor leaders. This presentation will be beneficial for employers, teachers and practitioners, as it will provide a framework to improve the menu planning for outdoor journeys and the overall wellbeing of outdoor leaders.


Biography:
Brendon Munge is an associate lecturer in Outdoor and Environmental Studies in the School of Education at the University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia. His teaching focuses on providing the foundational, practical and theoretical experiences for new outdoor educators as they prepare to work in the profession. He is a current PhD candidate with a focus on outdoor fieldwork pedagogy in higher education.

Dr Marcus Morse is a senior lecturer in Outdoor Environmental Education at La Trobe University, Australia. Marcus’ research interests are in the areas of place-based education, wild pedagogies, dialogue and forms of paying attention to outdoor environments.

‘Speaking up for safety’: Evaluating graded assertiveness frameworks to improve students’ capacity to advocate for safety in outdoor education settings

Mr Brendon Munge1, Julie Hanson1, Mr Daniel Wadsworth1, Ms Samantha Walsh1, Ms Tahia Marshall1
1University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia

 

Abstract:
Safety is a universal mandate in outdoor education. How new staff members are socialised into a safety culture focused on ‘speaking up for safety’ is of critical importance. However, communicating safety concerns amongst peers and in particular senior staff about their safety practices can be challenging when it raises questions about their conduct, authority and experience. This barrier to communication can lead to accidents and injuries for participants and staff involved in outdoor education programs. How then, can we encourage outdoor education practitioners to speak up for safety in a way that is heard and acted upon without concerns for offending others?

This presentation draws on recent nursing research that focused on improving the communication skills of students to ‘speak up for safety’ in preparation for their first clinical placement via the use of two graded assertiveness frameworks. The study identified that poor interpersonal relationships and ineffective health care team communication were dominant human factors contributing to clinical errors and adverse events. Nursing students were identified as lacking the skills to advocate for themselves, their patients and others when witnessing unsafe practice. Results revealed that assertiveness training provided an authentic learning experience for nursing students with practical application to the workplace.

Students of outdoor education face similar challenges in speaking up for safety. Two graded assertiveness frameworks were implemented in a first and third-year level undergraduate outdoor education course to improve students’ capacity to speak up when witnessing unsafe practice. The presentation will outline the two frameworks and report on the outcomes of the project to improve students’ capacity to ‘speak up for safety.’

This presentation will be beneficial for employers, teachers and practitioners as it will provide a framework to improve the communication related to safety within outdoor education.


Biography:
Brendon Munge is an associate lecturer in Outdoor and Environmental Studies in the School of Education at the University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia. His teaching focuses on providing the foundational practical and theoretical experiences for new outdoor educators as they prepare to work in the profession. He is a current PhD candidate with a focus on outdoor fieldwork pedagogy in higher education.

Is the involvement of your industry peak body helpful or harmful in a crisis situation?

Mr Dom Courtney1
1Queensland Outdoor Recreation Federation

 

Abstract:

Peak bodies are directly involved in advocacy for industry standards and implementation of standards to reduce likelihood of incidents occurring. Should peak bodies be actively involved in response to things that go wrong in the outdoors?
Critical incident management planning (or crisis management planning) is the process by which an organisation deals with a disruptive and unexpected event that threatens to harm the organisation or its stakeholders.
Three elements are common to a crisis: (a) a threat to the organisation, (b) the element of surprise, and (c) a short decision time. It can be argued that “crisis is a process of transformation where the old system can no longer be maintained”. Therefor the fourth defining quality is the need for change. If change is not needed, the event could more accurately be described as a failure or incident. (Adapted from Wikipedia)
An industry peak body may have different objectives to the organisation at the centre of a crisis situation. Does a different perspective help or hinder the response?
During 2019, QORF and Outdoor Educators Association of Queensland co-hosted a series of workshops on critical incident management planning for the outdoor education sector and the broader outdoor activity community.
This workshop is not intended to be a repeat of the preparedness workshops. This workshop is intended to be an open and frank discussion of whether an outdoor peak organisation should get involved in a crisis situation that an outdoor organisation may be experiencing, and if the peak body should be involved, on what terms?


Biography:
Dom Courtney is Executive Officer of QORF, the peak body for outdoor activities across Queensland.
A crucial part of Dom’s role is to assist the outdoor sector to change from what it is currently into what it should be, while ensuring that decision-makers realise the importance/value of the outdoor sector and its paid and unpaid workers.

Dom previously worked as a land & water manager for a State government agency and in local government, as well as a previous career in the construction industry.
Due to his role with QORF, Dom is on the Board of the Outdoor Council of Australia and the board of Active Queenslanders Industry Alliance.

How can current and new assessment tools be used to measure the attainment of threshold concepts in university outdoor education programs?

Mr Scott Polley1, Dr Beth McLeod2, Dr Brendon Munge3, Mr Joss Rankin4, Dr Brian Wattchow5, Mr Peter Bovina6, Dr Duncan Picknoll7, Mr Josh Ambrosy8, Mr Nicholas Glover1
1University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; 2Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Australia; 3University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia; 4Flinders University, Bedford Park, Australia; 5Federation University, Churchill, Australia; 6Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia; 7Notre Dame University, Fremantle, Australia; 8Federation University, Ballarat, Australia

 

Abstract:
Following an initial scoping paper (Polley and Thomas, 2017) a small team from the Australian Tertiary Outdoor Education network conducted a Delphi Study with other representatives to establish 7 threshold concepts that articulated what an Australian University Outdoor Education graduate knows and is able to do (Thomas, Grenon, Morse, Allen-Craig, Mangelsdorf and Polley, 2019). This presentation presents initial findings from a study conducted with representatives from the Australian Tertiary Outdoor Education network examining assessment tools and strategies that could be adapted for use to assess the seven threshold concepts identified in the aforementioned study. Assessment tool exemplars will be shared in the presentation demonstrating how they effectively measure what university graduates know and can do.


Biography:
Scott Polley is Senior Lecturer in Outdoor Education at University of South Australia, ATOEN Deputy Chair, OEA representative for OEASA.

Beth McLeod is Lecturer in Exercise Science and Outdoor Leadership at Australian Catholic University.
Brian Wattchow is Senior Lecturer in Sport and Outdoor Education at Federation University.
Josh Ambrosy is a Lecture of Outdoor Education at Federation University. He is also a late phase doctoral candidate with Deakin University. Josh’s research draws upon arts-based methodologies to explore both middle years and outdoor curriculum structures.

Brendon Munge is Associate Lecturer in Outdoor Environmental Studies at the University of the Sunshine Coast. He is currently undertaking his PhD focused on a cross discipline analysis of fieldwork pedagogies in higher education.

Joss Rankin is a lecturer At Flinders University. Joss coordinates and teaches in Foundations of Physical Education, School Health Promotion: Nutrition and Physical Activity and Introduction to Education in Outdoor Environments.

Dr Duncan Picknoll is Senior Lecturer and Coordinator of the Bachelor of Outdoor Recreation at University of Notre Dame.

Nicholas Glover is a sessional lecturer in Outdoor Education and Human Movement at University of South Australia.

Describing what a University outdoor education graduate knows and can do using the 7 threshold concepts – what does the profession think?

Mr Scott Polley1, Mrs Sandy Allen-Craig2, Dr Marcus Morse3, Dr Glyn Thomas4, Professor Tonia Gray5, Mr Anthony Mangelsdorf3
1University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; 2Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia; 3LaTrobe University, Bendigo, Australia; 4University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia; 5Western Sydney University, Western Sydney, Australia

 

Abstract:
Following an initial scoping paper (Polley and Thomas, 2017) a small team from the Australian Tertiary Outdoor Education network conducted a Delphi Study with other ATOEN representatives to establish seven threshold concepts that articulated what an Australian University Outdoor Education graduate knows and is able to do (Thomas, Grenon, Morse, Allen-Craig, Mangelsdorf, & Polley, 2019). The next logical step in the process of development of these concepts is to speak to stakeholders including those who work with and employ graduates in the outdoor education profession. This presentation describes the outcomes of a consultation process conducted across Australia that asked stakeholders questions about the suitability of the 7 threshold concepts. The project sought to establish if the efficacy of the threshold concepts for participants in the study and how they might best be communicated to the outdoor education profession. The presentation includes a forum to provide further input into these 7 thresholds with the aim of finalizing these as minimum concepts that are achieved by university graduates that have completed a minimum of 6 courses/subjects (or ¾ of a year of study within a Bachelor program).


Biography:
Scott Polley is Senior Lecturer in Outdoor Education at University of South Australia, ATOEN Deputy Chair, OEA representative for OEASA.

Sandy Allen-Craig is a Senior Lecturer in Outdoor Leadership at the Australian Catholic University. She has developed and implemented courses of Outdoor Education at the national tertiary level for over 30 years. She is currently the Deputy Chair of Outdoors Victoria, an Executive Member of Outdoor Education Australia and an Associate Editor of Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education.

Marcus Morse is Director, Outdoor Environmental Education in the School of Education at La Trobe University. His current research interests are in the areas of outdoor environmental education, dialogue in education, wild pedagogies and forms of paying attention within outdoor environments.

Dr Glyn Thomas teaches in the Bachelor of Recreation and Outdoor Environmental Studies program at the University of the Sunshine Coast. His research interests focus on teaching and learning in outdoor environmental education. He enjoys seeing and learning more about birds especially when climbing, paddling and walking.

Professor Tonia Gray is Senior Researcher for the Centre for Educational Research, School of Education Western Sydney University. She is the Chair of the Australian Tertiary Outdoor Education Network, Co-editor in Chief of the Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education and 2019 Distinguished Researcher of the Year.

Anthony Mangelsdorf is Associate Lecturer at LaTrobe University in Outdoor Environmental Education in the School of Education specialising in Alpine and Environmental Education.
Dr Duncan Picknoll is Senior Lecturer and Coordinator of the Bachelor of Outdoor Recreation at University of Notre Dame.

The Science of Safety: How history informs our practice

Dr Clare Dallat1
1The Outdoor Education Group, Burwood, Australia; 2Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems, The University of The Sunshine Coast, Sippy Down, Australia

 

Abstract:
As practitioners, whether in the office or the field, we apply tools daily to identify and manage foreseeable risks, as well as to learn from incidents when they do occur. But, where do these tools come from and what influences supported their development and uptake?

This session will explore why we use the tools we do to manage safety today. What does the 1930’s ‘domino’ theory of accident causation have to do with the early 1990’s Swiss Cheese model? Where did the human-error focused approach to safety management emerge from? What role did high-visibility accidents and disasters such as Three Mile Island and Challenger play in advancing the theoretical dialogue surrounding accident causation? This session will assist participants to better understand the foundations of safety science over the past Century, and in turn, how they have influenced the risk and safety management tools, beliefs and assumptions we use in our work every day.


Biography:
Dr Clare Dallat is Executive Director of Research and The Outdoor Education Foundation at The Outdoor Education Group. She has over twenty years of practice in all aspects of the led-outdoor activity domain. She believes that humans grow by interacting with risk in environments that include real hazards. Clare directs Risk Resolve, a consultancy service that works with organisations across the globe helping them to construct knowledge and confidence to proactively and reactively manage risks to their participants and staff. Clare holds a PhD in Human Factors from the Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems at The University of the Sunshine Coast, and an MSc. in Risk, Crisis and Disaster Management. In 2018, she became the first person outside of North America to win the prestigious Reb Gregg Award for exceptional leadership, innovation and contribution to international wilderness risk management.

Scouts Australia: Are we Ready?

Mr Jeffrey Lehrer1
1Scouts Australia, , Australia

 

Abstract:
The last five years has seen Scouts Australia undertake an entire review and redevelopment of the Scouts Youth Program, the first full review since the 1970s and this has resulted in some significant changes.

As an education movement that uses the outdoors to provide opportunities for growth and development, following the words of the founder Lord Baden-Powell Scouts Australia looked Far and Wide, which resulted in a new component of the Youth Program that is a structured approach to the development of Outdoor Adventure Skills which is now being implemented nationwide.

Being a community organisation who are actively involved in wider outdoor community consultations including the newly released Outdoor Leadership qualifications and the Australian Adventurous Activity Standards, Scouts Australia have been looking Up and Out at what is occurring elsewhere and how does that impact on the implementation of the Outdoor Adventure Skills component of the Youth Program.

Having looked Far and Wide and created a new and exciting program and looked Up and Out to ensure that Scouts Australia meets community standards, then came the hardest look of all. Scouts Australia looked internally at the existing policies and training to prepare adult volunteers to support the Outdoor Adventure Skills component of the new program.

Existing policies and structures were based on practices that existed prior to the release of the new Scouts Australia Youth Program, prior to the release of the new Outdoor Leadership qualifications, prior to the release of the new Australian Adventurous Activity Standards. Are we ready and how do we communicate that was the unfolding adventurous learning journey.


Biography:
Jeffrey Lehrer has a long affiliation with the outdoor education sector and is currently employed by Scouts Australia managing the Scouts Australia Institute of Training and voluntarily is a Scout leader and the Chair of the Sport and Recreation Industry Reference Committee.

About OEA and Outdoors NSW

Outdoor Education Australia (OEA)  was established in 2006 as a national network of outdoor education associations. The organisation facilitates communication between state and territory outdoor education associations about the practice and delivery of outdoor education; advocates for outdoor education across primary, secondary and tertiary education; and provides policy advice.

Outdoors NSW is the go-to place for all things outdoors in NSW.

The peak body for the outdoors in NSW, the organisation, (formerly known as ORIC), represents the outdoor community, advances outdoor standards, safety and practices, and fosters greater participation in the outdoors.

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